While we have experienced a little more rain in Melbourne of late, it is still important to recognise the value of our stormwater and how we should re-use it in our gardens.

The benefits of this include:

  • Allowing water that falls on the site to be returned to the soil and maintaining as close to a natural balance as we can
  • Reducing manual watering by directing water to planted beds
  • Providing an attractive feature to any garden environment

And perhaps the most attractive benefit:

  • Financial savings by reducing your metered water use in the garden

This article by Melbourne Water provides a great start to understanding and installing raingardensThe different types of raingardens are discussed in that article and below the Genus team has put together some examples of each.

Planter box raingarden
“This type of raingarden is positioned above the ground to collect stormwater from a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the raingarden before connecting to the stormwater system.”

(www.melbournewater.com.au)

(www.melbournewater.com.au)

Inground raingarden
“This type of raingarden is positioned in the ground to collect stormwater from hard surfaces or a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the raingarden before connecting to the stormwater system.”

(www.southeastwater.com.au)

(www.southeastwater.com.au)

Infiltration raingarden
“This type of raingarden is positioned in the ground to collect stormwater from hard surfaces or a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the raingarden and penetrate into the surrounding soil.”

Infiltration garden under construction (Genus Landscape Architects)

Infiltration garden under construction
(Photo by Genus Landscape Architects)

Swale
“A slight depression in the landscape which can be either grassed or planted with other vegetation.”

DRAINAGE SWALE

(Photo by Genus Landscape Architects)

Green roof
“When the roof of a building is covered in vegetation and soil to assist with the filtration of stormwater.”

Department of Sustainability Office - Queenscliffe (Photo by Genus Landscape Architects)

Department of Sustainability Office – Queenscliffe
(Photo by Genus Landscape Architects)

Porous paving
“A permeable material, often brick like, that allows water to penetrate through into the surrounding soil.”

Pebblite Porous Paving
(www.safetsurfaces.com.au)

Downpipe diversion
“When a roof downpipe diverts roof water through a hose via a d-shape mechanism, allowing water to soak into the garden and surrounding soil.”

Raintap Water Diverter (www.m2greenerlivingsolutions.com.au)

Rainwater tank diversion
“Similar to a downpipe diversion only the d-shape mechanism is fitted to the overflow of the rainwater tank.”

(www.waterunlimited.com.au)

The team at Genus encourages the implementation of raingardens and is more than happy to discuss how they can be designed into any landscape project.

For more information, refer to What is a Raingarden | Melbourne Water.

– Jason

How have you used a raingarden at your home?